By Steve LaMontia, Director of Communications

Aaron Selix from Millbrae, California plays in the 35-over and 50-over divisions of the Bay Area MSBL located in (you guessed it) San Francisco.  He has been a part of the league for eleven years and misses the game like we all do right now.

“I think I speak for everyone in our league in that it’s an emotional letdown to not be playing ball right now,” said Selix.  “We all get up for it come February or so.  Getting ready to play, planning things out, and just being with the guys on Sundays.  Baseball is a tough game and there are times where you ask yourself, “why am I doing this at my age?”  But then you wake up the next day and understand why.  Baseball represents the yearly cycle we all live by – springtime it starts, and in the fall it ends.  And every year, no matter what happened in the previous year, you get another chance!”

“Watching MLB Network classic games of the past keeps me involved in the game during this time.  Bill Buckner, Bucky Dent, Kirk Gibson, Carlton Fisk – any serious baseball fan knows instantly what game I’m talking about!  The game has changed since 30-40 years ago, and the players today are much more refined and skilled than the players of past generations.  But at the end of the day, it’s still the same game, and today’s professional baseball environment has become too focused on the business side where back then it seemed it was more just guys playing ball.”

What is your biggest takeaway from our current coronavirus outbreak? “How we take our simple freedoms for granted!  Not being able to do anything besides groceries.  No gym, no fields, no movies, nothing.  Is this a glimpse of prison life?  I don’t know for sure, but having all these things taken away really tells us we take them for granted.  And how you can’t get a haircut and have to do it yourself!”  (I won’t send you that picture!)

“The weather has been cold and frankly I’m not motivated right now for much of a workout so I’m not missing much,” explained Aaron.  “It feels like December and the season is months away.   Right now, what’s missing is the light at the end of the tunnel.  When I see it, I’ll start throwing again.  Baseball, please come back!”

“The good part is that I am able to spend more time with my daughter, whatever that entails.  Just being a dad.  It’s hard to explain to a four-year old why she can’t go to the park.  I am also spending more time playing my guitars and writing/recording music, which I’ve been doing forever.  Luckily, I am still working enough to keep busy and hope to keep doing so, but in the next few weeks that will probably change.”