By Steve LaMontia, Director of Communications

Adrian Riley is an Assistant Nurse Manager at Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital and is now in his third year in the 35-over division of the Columbus Men’s Baseball League, after beginning his MABL/MSBL career in 2005 in the 18-over division there in Columbus, where he hung his cleats for 12 years. Then came four years in the 25-over division in the same league and as mentioned previously, Adrian is currently in his third year of stepping up to the 35-over playing for a ‘great group of guys’, the Columbus Lugnuts.

Adrian is not only a medical professional selflessly helping others during this troubling time, he has also won the league’s 2018 Silver Slugger award for the highest batting average at .531.  Then he did it back-to-back with a .585 average in 2019. ‘I’m hoping for a three-peat!’  He and some quality ball players and friends from all over the league additionally make it a point to go to Florida and play in the MSBL Fall Classic.

As noted, Adrian is obviously a talented ball player but he was also gracious enough to share with us what it is like on the front lines as a medical professional during this pandemic.  Below is what Adrian was happy to convey to his fellow MSBL members.

“I work at the Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital as an Assistant Nurse Manager. This is on the Head and Neck/ neurology floor where we do a lot of flaps and brain surgeries. With all those procedures that could potentially aerosol, you can see there is a scare almost constantly. I recently switched into this role right as this whole thing started in mid-March. It was a great time to move into upper management, but obviously I had no idea it would be this hectic.

My on-boarding process has been challenging as I am unable to meet any of my peers. We use webex and zoom meetings for almost all encounters/meetings needed. I am sure to be a whiz if these continue! I have been a Registered Nurse for about nine years now…all within the OSUMC system, specifically the James.

We have changes being made almost always in the moment, to which we must role out and explain to the staff. We all must be checking our temps every 18 hours prior to reporting for work. We are all required to wear masks and practice the normal social distancing you hear about. I sympathize with our patients, as the visitation is strictly limited. We try to make every effort or resource available so that loved ones are able to see/hear their family members.

All in all, we go about business each day. We make sure we are running a safe and effective hospital. Our leaders at the forefront of this have done an exceptional job relaying new policies down, so that we may train and educate staff, patients, and families alike. I am proud to say we have been one of the leading hospitals in recycling and sanitizing masks thanks to our engineers at Batel, a nearby partner.

I feel safe when I am at work and honestly keep quite calm, despite all that is going on around us. I find my free time practicing and doing what I can to prepare for the season, whenever it may come. Our commissioner (Rick Fryman) has done a great job of keeping us all informed.”

Best wishes and I hope to catch you on the diamond soon!